Sourdough Galletes

June’s Sourdough Surprise is sourdough gallete.

I’m going to keep things simple this month and follow the suggested pâte brisée (shortcrust pastry) recipe, which once converted from cups and cubits looks like:

  • 140g plain wholemeal flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 115g unsalted butter, cold, cut into 1cm cubes
  • 125g unrefreshed, chilled, sourdough starter (100% hydration)

Using the food processor I cut the butter into the dry ingredients

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Then add the sourdough starter.

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Which comes together to form a rather wet and glutenous pastry dough.

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This gets chilled before being used.

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While it chills I make the filling. Or rather fillings, as I’m actually making two lots of pastry and doing sweet and savoury fillings for a double-gallete dinner!

For the savoury one I’m going with asparagus, goat cheese & homemade pesto.

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Which is a little wetter than I’d like for going on pastry, but it’s too late to do anything about that now.

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After rolling out and covering with pesto the goats cheese and asparagus goes on, along with some bacon that was lying around.

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This goes into the oven at 180C fan for 30 minutes.

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This gets served with some boiled potatoes.

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Despite the large amount of sourdough starter the pastry was surprisingly pastry like! And of course with goats cheese and bacon it was delicious.

The sweet filling is going to be from the garden where I’m raiding the strawberries.

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And the rhubarb (in which there is a cat hiding).

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I’ll pre-bake the fruit in sugar and a little salt to remove some of the liquid before using it in the gallete.

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For the gallete I’ll sprinkle with demerara sugar and flaked almonds.

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Bake at 180C fan for 30 minutes.

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Serve with cream.

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Despite the sugar during the pre-baking, and the sugar on the gallete, this was surprisingly tart, probably due to the sour pastry. We agreed it would have benefitted from a layer of jam before the fruit went on.

It was quite fun using sourdough to make pastry, and the galletes were tasty, but to be honest I think they’d have been better with a nice short pastry, rather than the chewier pastry you get from adding glutenous sourdough starter to the dough.


Check out what the rest of the Sourdough Surprises team did this month!

 

9 thoughts on “Sourdough Galletes

    1. It’s our first year of rhubarb so we’re excited to have it too! Although like most things in the garden it comes in such a glut that we’ve now got too much of it – so look out for a rhubarb jam blog post soon!

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  1. Love the savoury version you did! I did a (rather disasterous) rhubarb tarte tatin with the leftover pastry and it was practically too tart to eat – I guess rhubarb needs LOTS of sugar! I’m very impressed by your prolific rhubarb plant.

    About the pastry – I’ve made the Bojon Gourmet’s sourdough pastry a few times now and found that I don’t need the full amount of sourdough starter – I just add it little by little and fold it in until the pastry just clumps together, and it comes out nice and short and flaky. Adding too much starter will give you an overly wet pastry, leading to too much gluten development, hence the chewy texture… Just something to keep in mind if you give the recipe another try :)

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    1. I might give it another try then — it did produce a very wet pastry and it was only after chilling did it seem pastry-like.

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      1. I used a lot less starter too. Only enough to get it to start clumping together as one would if using milk or water. No chewiness.
        I really like your savoury version.
        In a recent Cook’s Illustrated magazine, they used 2 pounds of rhubarb, 1 pound of strawberries and 8.75 ounces of sugar. Lots of sugar needed.

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